Things to do in Meath

There are a whole host of off-site activities in the local area. Some of these include:

Ancient Heritage Sites | Castles | Forest Parks | Golfing | Family Adventure Parks | Whiskey Distillery | Falconry| Angling | Walking | Boating| Local Visitor Attractions.

Newgrange  in the Boyne Valley is a 5000 year old Passage Tomb famous for the Winter Solstice illumination (30 min drive).

Newgrange in the Boyne Valley is a 5000 year old Passage Tomb famous for the Winter Solstice illumination (30 min drive).

Tour national heritage sites

The Boyne Valley, also known as Ireland’s Ancient-East is probably one of the most interesting areas in Ireland to visit and only half an hours drive from Rathe. The world famous megalithic tombs and passage graves at Newgrange, Dowth, Knowth and Loughcrew, the Royal site at the Hill of Tara, are all vivid reminders of our glorious Celtic past.

Enjoy live Irish traditional music in our local thatched Irish pub  Gartlans   established  in 1911 (10 min drive).

Enjoy live Irish traditional music in our local thatched Irish pub Gartlans established in 1911 (10 min drive).

Experience the local culture

Why not take in some traditional live Céilí music, food and dance every Sunday in our local Gartlan’s Pub established in 1911 and located in the nearby town of Kingscourt, Co Cavan.

The newly established Slane Irish Whiskey Distillery is also only a 25 minute drive from Rathe and takes visitors through their heritage room, barley room, cooperage, and maturation warehouse before a final a view of their pot stills and production areas. The tour concludes in the best way possible with a taste of their signature triple casked blend, Slane Irish Whiskey.

Dún na Rí Forest Park  is 299 hectares and provided castle ruins, waterfalls and a famous wishing well to explore (10 min drive).

Dún na Rí Forest Park is 299 hectares and provided castle ruins, waterfalls and a famous wishing well to explore (10 min drive).

Explore our forest parks

Dun a Ri Forest Park (229 heactares) forms part of what was formerly the Cabra Estate which was owned by the Pratt family. Legend stretches back to the time of Cuchullain the Gaelic warrior who rested in these woods while fighting the armies of Queen Maeve of Connaught